Put These Sins Aside

18 06 2020

McKee Road Baptist – June 10, 2020 Wednesday Evening – Coronavirus Emailed

Colossians 3:8-9 But now ye also put off all these; anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy,
filthy communication out of your mouth. (9) Lie not one to another, seeing that ye have
put off the old man with his deeds;

We are in the practical section of the epistle of the Colossians. Paul is calling the
Colossians to deal with sin, to put it to death. This is a call for practical holiness.
Colossians 3:4-5 When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear
with him in glory. (5) Mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth;
fornication, uncleanness, inordinate affection, evil concupiscence, and covetousness,
which is idolatry:

As believers, we are to put sin to death. In view of all that God has done for us in Christ,
in view of our dwelling in His presence, our response is to live a holy life out of gratitude.

Ephesians 5:1 Be ye therefore followers of God, as dear children;

As children of God, we are to imitate our father. When people see us, they should see a
reflection of our Father. We bear the Father’s name and must be consistent to live a life
that will speak well of the name we bear.

Ezekiel 36:22-23 Therefore say unto the house of Israel, thus saith the Lord God: I do
not this for your sakes, O house of Israel, but for mine holy name’s sake, which ye have
profaned among the heathen, whither ye went. (23) And I will sanctify my great name,
which was profaned among the heathen, which ye have profaned in the midst of them;
and the heathen shall know that I am the Lord, saith the Lord God, when I shall be
sanctified in you before their eyes.

Believers, we are to live morally pure lives which displays God to the world. When we
do not live as we should, we profane the name of God. We must understand that how
we live affects the world in which we live. We often fail to realize how crucial to the
purpose of God is the behavior of His people.

2 Corinthians 3:2 Ye are our epistle written in our hearts, known and read of all men:

You are a living epistle of God, known and read by all men. As a born-again child of
God, we must consider what the lost are learning by our walk. Brothers and Sisters, we
are to live holy lives. Our God is holy and so are we to be. Paul continues to list sins that are to be put aside:

Colossians 3:8 But now ye also put off all these; anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy,
filthy communication out of your mouth.

We are commanded to “put off” the sins of verse five. The six sins of verses eight and
nine, we are to “put aside.” God wants us to divest (unload) ourselves of these six sins.
The analogy changes from killing to removing. The sins of these verses are sins of the mouth. These are sins that are generally acceptable in Christian circles. “These are Christian sins.” That is like an “honest thief.” There is no such animal. Paul starts verse 8 with “But now” to give us a contrast from verse 7.

Colossians 3:6-7 For which things’ sake the wrath of God cometh on the children of
disobedience: (7) In the which ye also walked some time, when ye lived in them.

Verse seven talks about their life before coming to Christ, and verse 8 says, “But now.”
Which tells us that belief in the cross is the dividing line the believer’s life. The Christian
has a new identity.

Paul tells them, ‘But now ye also put off all these; anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy,
filthy communication out of your mouth.” . As believers, we are to put off the following
list of sins, they are no longer to be part of our life. For which things’ sake the wrath of
God cometh on the children of disobedience: (7) In the which ye also walked some time,
when ye lived in them.

The words “put off” are from the Greek word apotithemi, which means: “to put away
(literally or figuratively.), cast off, lay apart (aside, down), put away (off).” It has the idea:
“to take off like a suit of clothes.”

“Put off” is a lesser word than “mortify” of verse five. “Put off” simply means to disrobe.
The metaphor is one of taking off clothes.
God wants us to put off the sins of this verse like we would take off dirty clothes after
working in the yard. The tense indicates that we are to take off the following dirty sins as
a definite act. Discard these sins as we would throw dirty clothes in a hamper.

Anger

“Anger” is the Greek word orge. It speaks of a chronic resentment. “Anger” combines
both anger and revenge.

It is the hostility of the mind. It is the demonstration of strong passion (which may issue in anger or revenge, though it does not necessarily include it). This sin of anger is rampant in our society. (Consider the last couple of weeks in America.) If we delay one instant after the light changes, or cut someone off on the freeway, we can trigger vile language, a vulgar gesture, and even a gun shot. If a waitress is slow at a restaurant, a line is too long, or a checker seems too slow, the result may be outbursts of anger. Grudges, resentments, bitterness are common companions in homes causing chronic anger, violence, or abusive talk. It seems our society has lost its civility.

Children of God get angry, but most of us have been taught to internalize our anger,
rather than to express it outwardly. We may not show it but we still seethe with the best
of them. Who among us can truly say that we have not been angry this past week?
The reality is that all of us face situations and challenges that may make us angry and
no one is immune. Regardless of our emotional makeup, anger affects all of us, and
when we allow anger to control us, the outcome could be very costly.

That said, not all anger is sin. Ephesians 4:26 says, “Be ye angry, and sin not:” This
tells us something very important. There is an anger that is acceptable.
Paul tells us in Colossians 3:8 to put off anger. In Ephesians 4:26, he says, “Be ye
angry”. Taken by themselves and out of context, we seemingly have two conflicting
statements from Paul. The solution to this apparent contradiction is found in the fact that
there are two kinds of anger. Paul is commanding the Ephesians to be angry in a way
that is righteous, that is a reflection of God.

True anger is that which is concerned with others’ wrongs. You can see it in Jesus: He
was angry at the Pharisees when they opposed His healing of men on the Sabbath day.
“And when he had looked round about on them with anger” Mark 3:5, we read, “being
grieved for the hardness of their hearts” over their stubborn indifference to the needs of
suffering humanity. It made Him angry.

Sinful anger is anger that is self-defensive. It is always wrong. Sinful anger is part of the
old life, it is to be put off. If you are angry because your feelings have been hurt, or your
pride has been injured, or you have been mistreated in some way, perhaps you have
not been given the position of the place or the favor that you think you ought to have,
this is sinful anger and is to be put off.

The Cause of Sinful Anger

One root cause of anger is pride. When things do not go our way in life, when our pride
is offended, we get angry. Humble people do not get angry, because they never feel
they deserve better than they are getting. Nothing causes anger as quickly as thinking
too highly of ourselves. The more exalted we are in our own eyes, the more justified we
will feel in being angry with the person who offended us:

Proverbs 13:10 Only by pride cometh contention: but with the well advised is wisdom.

Admitting that the control of anger is not within our power is part of the solution. We
need the supernatural help of Christ, because it is not enough to refrain from expressing
anger. The Christian is called to love the person with whom we are angry:

1 Corinthians 13:4 Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity
vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up.

The first thing Paul says about love is that it “suffereth long.” This is the Greek word
makrothumeo, this word, as it is used in the New Testament, is a word that conveys the
idea of having an infinite capacity to be injured without paying back. It is used with
regard to people, not circumstances. The loving person is able to be inconvenienced or
taken advantage of by a person and yet not be upset or angry.

Wrath

“Wrath” is the turbulent commotion of the mind, rage. The Greeks likened it to a fire in
straw which flares up briefly and is gone. It is used to speak of those in the synagogue
of Nazareth who exploded in anger upon hearing Jesus’ teachings Luke 4:28.

“Anger” is the heat of the fire, and “wrath” is the bursting forth in flame. “Anger” is less
sudden in its rise, but more lasting. “Wrath” is a more agitated condition. It is more of a
state of intense anger with outbursts of passionate anger coming from indignation.

“Anger” is a more settled condition of the attitude, frequently with a view to taking
revenge. It is less sudden in its rise, but more lasting in its nature.

“Anger” expresses more inward feeling. It’s more active than “wrath.” “Wrath” may
produce revenge, but it does not necessarily include it. Characteristically, it blazes.

Malice

“Malice” is the desire to hurt others. This is a vicious character. It is the quality of
wickedness with the implication of that which is harmful and damaging. “Malice” is a
feeling of hostility and strong dislike with a possible implication of desiring to do harm.

Blasphemy

Anger, wrath, and malice often result in blasphemy. The Greek word translated
“blasphemy” is blasphemia, from which our English word blasphemy derives. When
used in relation to God it is blasphemy. When used in relation to people, as here, it is
profane speak.

This profane speech is to speak ill of someone and hurt their name and reputation. It
means to speak against someone in such a way as to harm or injure his or her
reputation.

Filthy Communication

The result of anger, wrath, and malice is filthy communication. Filthy Communication is
from the Greek word aischrologia, meaning: “low and obscene speech” which occurs
here only in the New Testament. That term refers to obscene and derogatory speech
intended to hurt and wound someone. It could be translated: “foulmouthed abuse”.
Jesus said:

Matthew 12:35 A good man out of the treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things:
and an evil man out of the evil treasure bringeth forth evil things.

This list of sins in verse 8 ends with “…out of your mouth.” This phrase may not only
refer to “filthy communication,” but the entire list of sins in verse 8. If so, then the entire
list of sins is cataloged as sins of the mouth. “Anger” and “wrath” are forms of “filthy
communication.”

Jesus said that the mouth reveals what is in the heart. James 3:10-11 says, “out of the
same mouth proceedeth blessing and cursing. My brethren, these things ought not so to
be. (11) Doth a fountain send forth at the same place sweet water and bitter? James
3:10,11.

If you want a guideline to speech, here it is:

Ephesians 4:29 Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that
which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace unto the hearers.

Colossians 3:9 Lie not one to another, seeing that ye have put off the old man with his
deeds;

“Lie” is the Greek word pseudomai. It means, “stop lying.”
If you did a Bible study on lying, and you began in Genesis, you would find the
following: Satan lied in deceiving Adam and Eve Genesis 3:45. Cain lied to God after murdering Abel Genesis 4:9. Abraham lied, claiming Sarah was his sister instead of his
wife Genesis 12:11-19; 20:2. Sarah lied to the three angelic visitors Genesis 18:15
and to the king of Gerar Genesis 20:5. Isaac lied by denying that Rebecca was his wife
Genesis 26:7-10. Rebecca and Issacs lied in their conspiracy to defraud Esau of his
birthright Genesis 27:6-24. That list does not even get us out of Genesis. Paul had
good reason to tell Christians to stop lying to one another.

Lying is part of society, and all too often we get caught up in the practice, too. Too often
many of us feel pressure to distort truth in order to survive in our culture.
Though our society gives ample place to the lie, the Lord does not. The Bible teaches
us that telling the truth is a necessity for survival of life as we know it. Chaos always
results when lies replace truth.

God hates lying and commands us to deal truthfully with each other:

Proverbs 6:16-19 These six things doth the Lord hate: yea, seven are an abomination
unto him: (17) A proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, (18)
An heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, feet that be swift in running to mischief, (19)
A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren.

Out of this list of seven abominations, two of them deal with lying. God hates lying!

Proverbs 12:19 The lip of truth shall be established for ever: but a lying tongue is but
for a moment.

Proverbs 12:22 Lying lips are abomination to the LORD: but they that deal truly are his
delight.

Psalm 15:1 asks the question, “Lord, who shall abide in thy tabernacle?” and gives this
answer:

Psalms 15:2 He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness, and speaketh the
truth in his heart.

In a word, lying was to be rooted out of God’s people Israel. God hates lying equally as
much today.

Lying is so much part and parcel of today’s society that many Christians feel they need
to lie from time to time if they’re going to survive, let alone function, in this society.
And then there what are called, “white-lies.” They are called that, because they are
considered harmless. But, when you see this in the light of the Scriptures, you see that
a white lie, so-called, is still a lie.

White lies usually occur in circumstances where we are asked to give our opinion about
one’s dress or personality, and we feel negative about it but do not want to say anything
for fear of hurting their feelings, so we lie, we say the nice thing, the pleasant thing,
and their feelings are not hurt. This is situational ethics.

A liar lives under the pressure of always having to remember what was said, coupled
with the fear of exposure and the necessity of telling more lies. Truth becomes relative.
Truth becomes what we want it to be. Lying becomes a kind of personal prison.

It was the honesty of Christians that made them appear as lights in a dark world, which
made the Christian faith attractive. We have a similar potential today that will bring great
honor to Jesus.

Illustration: There is the story of a father who was taking his two sons to play miniature
golf. He inquired of the price, and the attendant told him it was $5.00 for him and $5.00
for any child over six. Adding all children six and under play free. The father told him
one boy was three and one was seven. “You could have saved $5.00 if you said the
older boy was six. I wouldn’t have known the difference.” The father replied, “Yes, that is
true, but my boys would have known the difference.”

That’s depravity of the human heart that makes a person save $5.00 by being a liar.
How many fathers are teaching their children to be dishonest?
Believers, Christ is our life. He is in the presence of God; we are in the presence of
God. We must deal with our sins and seek to walk in holiness. When it comes to sin, we
must put them all aside.

Pastor Don Thomason


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